Practice News & Articles

Debunking a few myths about Psychologists

People are sometimes reluctant to contact a psychologist because of misconceptions about the practice. Following are a few myths worth debunking:

Psychologists and Psychiatrists are one and the same

Psychologists earn a Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) or Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in psychology. They are trained to diagnose and treat all manner of mental illness. Psychologists treat mental illness using psychotherapy and other non-invasive treatments. Psychologists are the only doctoral-level mental health professionals who can do psychological testing. Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialize in psychiatry. They are also trained to diagnose and treat mental illness. Psychiatrists are able to treat patients using prescription medication whereas psychologists are only able to do so in limited circumstances (parts of the military; some states).

Psychotherapy only helps patients vent their feelings

While it can be important to express your thoughts and feelings in therapy, it is not the only thing that makes a lasting change in your emotions or behavior. For that to happen, you will need to change some of the ways you connect to others, particularly those closest to you. You may need guidance from your psychologist to do so and you will probably need to work outside of therapy to make these changes.

Psychologists cause major changes in therapy 

You need to be an active participant for therapy to be of value to you. You and your psychologist must work together to understand your problems and solve them. Your psychologist alone cannot make you better. For that reason, people who have been pressured to see a psychologist who are not motivated will not be helped by it.

Therapy mainly focuses on your childhood and parental relationship 

While therapy may involve understanding how your childhood may have contributed to your problems, cognitive-behavioral therapy focuses on changing current maladaptive patterns of thinking and behavior.

Therapy lasts for years

Most patients complete therapy in three to six months – sometimes less. There are instances where a patient needs to see a psychologist for a period of six to 12 months and sometimes more. Most patients benefit from once-a-week sessions. Twice weekly sessions are usually not for the more seriously ill patients, rather, that intensity of treatment is for stronger and healthier patients who can tolerate more intensive psychotherapy.  

Television Appearances

August 2009
Comcast Newsmakers
Topic: Stress and the Economy
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June 22, 2009
Despierta America;
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Topic: Talking to Children
about Money
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June 18, 2009
Despierta America;
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Topic: Father's Day
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February 3, 2009           
Despierta America;
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Topic: Excess Homework
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January 13, 2009
Despierta America;
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Topic: Infertility
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August 25, 2008
Primer Impacto;
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Topic: Corporal Punishment
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Articles


Additional Presentations:

Please send us an e-mail to request a copy of these.

May 16, 2009             
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Health Symposium
Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands
 
May 16, 2009             
Stress Management
Health Symposium
Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands

August 10, 2005
When is it Time to Get Help for Your Child?
Community Christian Church
Plantation, Florida

July 13, 2005
Depression and Anxiety
Community Christian Church
Plantation, Florida

July 1, 2004
Stress Management
Women's Business Network
Sunrise, Florida